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Submitted on
January 5, 2007
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220 KB
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850×567
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874
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15

Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
Shutter Speed
1/50 second
Aperture
F/4.5
Focal Length
90 mm
ISO Speed
200
Date Taken
Jan 3, 2008, 6:30:11 AM
×
Lucias III 1-3-07 by oOBrieOo Lucias III 1-3-07 by oOBrieOo
Little Lucias is growing up. He's finally completing his color change, and I am very pleased. I love all that blue coming in.

Lucias is a Merauke locality green tree python.
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:iconcrypticpython:
CrypticPython Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Love the intense eye, well captured & a beautiful python.
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:iconsildar-god:
sildar-god Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
the blue is spectacular! i gain more and more respect for GTPs every time i see them. i'm trying to find a few decent looking and semi-affordable ones here, but those are mutually exclusive things it seems. do you ever have any trouble or difficulty keeping him?
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:iconoobrieoo:
oOBrieOo Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2010
Looks definitely come with a price. Lucias, out of all of the gtps i've purchased over the years, was one of the cheapest at $750. The most expensive was my first one, she was $2500 as a baby due to bloodline.
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:iconsildar-god:
sildar-god Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
mother of... OUCH...

were you able to breed from her?
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:iconoobrieoo:
oOBrieOo Featured By Owner Jul 3, 2010
Nah, never really got into breeding of GTPs, too much of a pain in the ass for me. lol.
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:iconsildar-god:
sildar-god Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
a pain in the ass? howso?
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:iconoobrieoo:
oOBrieOo Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2010
Everything about GTPs is a pain in the ass. Its one of the reasons they're so expensive, captive bred ones anyway. Their eggs and babies are some of the LEAST hardy of any species I have experience with. Getting the babies to eat is usually a challenge, some breeders can lose whole batches of babies to starvation just because they won't eat. And I dunno if you've ever seen a neonate chondro, but think half the size of a baby cornsnake. And much more fragile. They can break their spine just from falling off the perch wrong.
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:iconsildar-god:
sildar-god Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
dear god.. that explains their scarcity and price. how do they survive in the wild? i suppose it's like baby adders too, having to force feed them and you offset the fact that you won't be receiving a venomous bite with the fact that the retarded thing is one fall away from death the moment you turn your back... i suppose it's something to work towards, as a challenge.. now to find some affordable chondros to raise! muhahah!
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:iconoobrieoo:
oOBrieOo Featured By Owner Jul 7, 2010
I'd assume they have a fairly high mortality rate in the wild, which is why snakes in general usually have high clutch counts. GTPs can have anywhere from 12 to 60 eggs. I attended a couple arboreal boids symposium, one of which had an australian herpetologist do a super awesome talk about his time spent with the australian iron range GTPs. He found out alot of neat stuff no one else had known about, like neonate GTPs eating moths and beatles as part of their diet. Also the fact that the only 2 rodents common in their ranges are a mouse and a very small rat... Both of which would only make up a small part of the adult diet, and almost nothing in the juvie diet. So they're eating mostly frogs and tiny lizards as juvies. So all of this wraps up to explain why breeders have such a hard time getting them to take pinky mice or mammals in general as neonates.
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:iconmidgarzolom:
MidgarZolom Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
Nice detail on the eye. The scales are nice too.
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